Latinx | Tag





Latinx



Latinx is a gender-neutral neologism, sometimes used instead of Latino or Latina to refer to people of Latin American cultural or racial identity in the United States. The ⟨-x⟩ suffix replaces the standard ⟨-o/-a⟩ ending of nouns and adjectives, typical of grammatical gender in Spanish. Its plural is Latinxs.

The term was first seen around 2004, predominantly online, among intersectional advocacy groups combining the identity politics of race and gender. It slowly gained in usage, and came into popular use around 2014, especially in American universities, where its use has since become widespread.

Reactions to this neologism have been mixed, with the most criticism coming from native Spanish speakers. There tends to be a generational and regional divide among supporters and critics of the term, with more support among young people in the United States, and more criticism among older generations, and from those outside the United States. Similar words used for this purpose include Chicanx, Latin@ and Latine.

















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