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Aboriginal Australians

Indigenous Australians are people with familial heritage to groups that lived in Australia before British colonisation. They include the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia. The term Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, or the person's specific cultural group (their mob), is often preferred, though the terms First Nations of Australia, First Peoples of Australia and First Australians are also increasingly common.


The time of arrival of the first peoples on the continent and nearby islands is a matter of debate among researchers. The earliest conclusively human remains found in Australia are those of Mungo Man LM3 and Mungo Lady, which have been dated to around 50,000 years BP. Recent archaeological evidence from the analysis of charcoal and artefacts revealing human use suggests a date as early as 65,000 BP. Luminescence dating has suggested habitation in Arnhem Land as far back as 60,000 years BP. Evidence of fires in South-West Victoria suggest "human presence in Australia 120,000 years ago", although more research is required. Genetic research has inferred a date of habitation as early as 80,000 years BP. Other estimates have ranged up to 100,000 years and 125,000 years BP.


The population of Aboriginal Australians at the time of permanent European settlement is contentious and has been estimated at between 318,000 and 1,000,000 with the distribution being similar to that of the current Australian population, the majority living in the south-east, centred along the Murray River. A population collapse principally from disease followed European settlement, beginning with a smallpox epidemic spreading three years after the arrival of Europeans. Massacres and frontier conflicts involving European settlers also contributed to depopulation. The characterisation of this violence as genocide is debated.

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STIGMABASE is a canadian non-profit internet initiative dedicated to informing and raising awareness on the damaging effects of social exclusion and stigma around the world. The marginalization of individuals or categories of individuals is a too common phenomenon. Millions of people are facing this problem around the world and many complex factors are involved.


Montréal | Canada

With access to six universities and twelve junior colleges in an 8 kilometre radius, Montréal has the highest proportion of post-secondary students of all major cities in North America. Roughly 248,000 post-secondary students : one of the largest numbers in the world